‘I have had enough’ Roger Daltrey of The Who criticizes the internet for ‘ruining’ live performances.

uiop

Roger Daltrey, the legendary frontman of The Who, has recently voiced his frustration with the trend of fans looking up setlists before his live performances. As he prepares to embark on his solo, semi-acoustic North American tour, the 80-year-old musician has made a deliberate decision to keep the setlist a secret, preferring to preserve the element of surprise for concertgoers. He expressed his discontent with the current state of live concert culture, noting that the prevalence of setlist spoilers on the internet has diminished the excitement and spontaneity of live shows.

In an interview with Billboard, Daltrey lamented, “Too many people reveal songs. There’s no surprises left with concerts these days, because everybody wants to see the setlist.” His frustration with this phenomenon is evident as he emphasized, “I’m sick of it. The internet’s ruined the live shows for me. Who wants to know what’s coming next? People forget about surprises. I can’t stand it.”

'I have had enough' Roger Daltrey of The Who criticizes the internet for 'ruining' live performances. 4

Despite his efforts to keep the setlist under wraps, Daltrey did divulge that he plans to perform The Who’s classic track ‘Won’t Get Fooled Again’. However, he revealed that he won’t be delivering the song’s iconic scream, a signature moment in the band’s live performances, as it has taken a toll on his vocal cords over the years. Instead, he intends to involve the audience in recreating the memorable moment, allowing them to participate while he focuses on delivering the rest of the song.

Daltrey’s commitment to preserving the integrity of live performances extends to his views on the possibility of The Who participating in a digital concert residency. While his bandmate Pete Townshend has expressed interest in such an endeavor, Daltrey appears less enthusiastic. He humorously remarked, “What, we’re going to go out and do ABBA covers? I don’t think so. I’d look awful in a mini dress!”

'I have had enough' Roger Daltrey of The Who criticizes the internet for 'ruining' live performances. 5

Furthermore, Daltrey reiterated his skepticism, stating, “I’ve never thought about it. I wouldn’t want to go and see it.” Instead, he emphasized the importance of authenticity and integrity in The Who’s live performances, suggesting that the essence of the band lies in their original lineup and youthful energy from the 1960s. He expressed his reluctance to participate in a digital avatar show, reaffirming his commitment to delivering genuine live experiences to fans.

Daltrey’s candid remarks offer insight into his dedication to preserving the magic of live music and his unwavering commitment to authenticity in an industry increasingly influenced by technology and digital innovation. As he embarks on his solo tour, fans can anticipate an unforgettable evening of music and revel in the spontaneity and excitement of experiencing live performances without spoilers or expectations.

Roger Daltrey, the iconic frontman of The Who, has recently voiced a sentiment shared by many artists: frustration with the modern trend of fans spoiling setlists before live performances. As he gears up for his solo, semi-acoustic North American tour, the 80-year-old rocker has made a conscious decision to keep the setlist a tightly guarded secret. In a music landscape where instant access to information prevails, Daltrey is taking a stand to preserve the element of surprise and spontaneity that has long been synonymous with live concerts.

In an interview with Billboard, Daltrey expressed his exasperation, highlighting the pervasiveness of setlist spoilers online. “Too many people reveal songs,” he lamented. “There’s no surprises left with concerts these days, because everybody wants to see the setlist.” It’s a sentiment that resonates with many artists who thrive on the energy of live performances and the thrill of unexpected moments shared with their audience. For Daltrey, the internet’s intrusion into the live music experience has dimmed the excitement and magic that comes with discovering a concert’s setlist in real time.

'I have had enough' Roger Daltrey of The Who criticizes the internet for 'ruining' live performances. 6

If you like the article please follow on THE UBJ.

Exit mobile version