The Lord of the Rings: The Rings of Power's first two episodes have been playing a difficult and meticulously designed game of chess in order to build up characters, settings, plot elements, and story arcs for the remainder of the series, positioning and moving all the essential pieces.

The Elven High King, Gil-galad, however, has remained largely apart from the rest of the plot, appearing in only a few moments but yet setting important events in motion (Benjamin Walker).

In Tirharad, the "High King" is frequently mentioned, and his influence can be felt all throughout the continent. But where did the title of High King originate from, and how did Gil-galad get to the throne? In the first place, who is he?

In Tirharad, the "High King" is frequently mentioned, and his influence can be felt all throughout the continent. But where did the title of High King originate from, and how did Gil-galad get to the throne? In the first place, who is he?

There are many different types of elves in the world, and they can be identified by the processes that led to their division. For example, when elves originally emerged, the Avari were the ones that denied the Valar's invitation to visit Valinor.

The Teleri made stops along the path for those who obeyed the summons, and many of them never made it to the other end. Even if some Teleri did eventually make it to Valinor, the Teleri who opted to stay in Middle-earth were known as the Sindar.

Fingolfin, the father of Fingon and half-brother of Fanor, succeeded Maedhros as the first High King of the Noldor when the latter, who had been saved by an elf named Fingon, abdicated his throne as head of the House of Finw.

Gil-galad became the most successful and longest-reigning of the High Kings despite the depressingly brief job description of the Noldor High King, which often read: "Rule briefly before meeting a horrific fiery death."

After the War of Wrath, many of the Noldor made the decision to go back to Valinor, but Gil-galad remained and ruled over the remaining Noldor in Middle-earth.